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When you try to do something in hale studio that isn’t possible with the out-of-the-box functionality, hale offers several ways of creating that functionality yourself. The most accessible of these is to add your own transformation functions using Groovy scripting. There are several points where Groovy functions can be added:

  • Type Transformation Functions
  • Property Transformation Functions
  • Custom Functions
  • Post-processing scripts (only through the CLI)

Groovy is superset of Java, i.e. any valid Java program is also a valid Groovy program. What it makes much easier than Java is the creation of data structures – no boilerplate constructors and initialisation and the like. Here are some key resources for learning Groovy:

Often, you will be looking for some recipes and snippets to get started, and that is exactly what we will provide during this week: We will publish one Groovy Snippet per day. Each of my colleagues has selected their favourite script and will share it with all of you 😊.

Please note that this article assumes you have working knowledge of hale studio and know the terminology.

When you try to do something in hale studio that isn’t possible with the out-of-the-box functionality, hale offers several ways of creating that functionality yourself. The most accessible of these is to add your own transformation functions using Groovy scripting. There are several points where Groovy functions can be added:

  • Type Transformation Functions
  • Property Transformation Functions
  • Custom Functions
  • Post-processing scripts (only through the CLI)

Groovy is superset of Java, i.e. any valid Java program is also a valid Groovy program. What it makes much easier than Java is the creation of data structures – no boilerplate constructors and initialisation and the like. Here are some key resources for learning Groovy:

Often, you will be looking for some recipes and snippets to get started, and that is exactly what we will provide during this week: We will publish one Groovy Snippet per day. Each of my colleagues has selected their favourite script and will share it with all of you 😊.

Please note that this article assumes you have working knowledge of hale studio and know the terminology.

The Groovy Logo, by Zorak1103, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13358930

Monday’s Script: Build Polygons from Lines (Thorsten)

This script is my personal favorite. While relatively complex, it shows a lot of useful approaches how to work with geometries in a Groovy script.

This function was built for creating waterbody Polygons from LineString shore segments. It is executed in the context of a Merge type cell as a Greedy Groovy Script function. It takes a MultiLineString geometry with unsorted individual LineStrings and builds one to many polygons in a MultiPolygon from that input.

This is the script:



You can download this script here and import it in hale studio as a Groovy snippet by going to File -> Import -> Groovy Snippet. Please note that it uses some protected functions, so you need to “Lift Groovy Restrictions” to execute the script. It furthermore assumes a certain geometry attribute name (the_geom) that you might have to change.

Happy transforming!

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At our INSPIRE and Beyond conference, I shared some thoughts on INSPIRE as an open platform market, and about its potential to change how we utilize spatial data. As only about 35 of you were able to attend that presentation, I got several requests to also outline my thoughts on the matter in an article. So here you go!

What is a Platform Market?

You have probably heard about many of the most successful businesses of our time, such as Uber, AirBnB and Amazon. They have all been hugely successful and have been able to acquire millions of happy users.

What all these Platforms share is that they enable demand-driven growth by leveraging underutilized resources. Here are a few examples of platforms and the underutilized resource they made accessible:

  • AirBnB – Apartments
  • Uber – Private Cars
  • INSPIRE – Geospatial data

Making such resources available means that supply-side economics don’t play a big role in such platform markets. In a properly managed platform, the market is only limited by how much demand there is.

Platforms provide value units of at least one type:

  • AirBnB – Apartment Rental
  • Amazon – Article that can be bought
  • LinkedIn – Job Posts, Profiles, Group Posts
  • YouTube – Videos
  • INSPIRE – Spatial Data Sets and Services

Platforms are often two-sided or multi-sided marketplaces. This means that there are multiple stakeholder groups, not just the two groups typically involved into a single producer – consumer transaction. For INSPIRE, you will have these groups:

  • Regional, national and European Platform providers
  • Regional, national and European Data Providers
  • Regional, national and European Data Users
  • Service Providers
  • Service Users

One organization or person can take multiple roles at the same time, or in temporal succession.

A successful platform has to provide value to all actors, and the capture of value needs to be balanced carefully. If one group is extracting too much value, the platform can fail quickly. As an example, consider Uber, the ride-sharing platform: Most risks and costs lie with Drivers, some with Passengers, but basically none with the Platform operator. This has led to significant protests as well as legislation being passed that effectively banned Uber from operating in many territories.

At our INSPIRE and Beyond conference, I shared some thoughts on INSPIRE as an open platform market, and about its potential to change how we utilize spatial data. As only about 35 of you were able to attend that presentation, I got several requests to also outline my thoughts on the matter in an article. So here you go!

What is a Platform Market?

You have probably heard about many of the most successful businesses of our time, such as Uber, AirBnB and Amazon. They have all been hugely successful and have been able to acquire millions of happy users.

What all these Platforms share is that they enable demand-driven growth by leveraging underutilized resources. Here are a few examples of platforms and the underutilized resource they made accessible:

  • AirBnB – Apartments
  • Uber – Private Cars
  • INSPIRE – Geospatial data

Making such resources available means that supply-side economics don’t play a big role in such platform markets. In a properly managed platform, the market is only limited by how much demand there is.

Platforms provide value units of at least one type:

  • AirBnB – Apartment Rental
  • Amazon – Article that can be bought
  • LinkedIn – Job Posts, Profiles, Group Posts
  • YouTube – Videos
  • INSPIRE – Spatial Data Sets and Services

Platforms are often two-sided or multi-sided marketplaces. This means that there are multiple stakeholder groups, not just the two groups typically involved into a single producer – consumer transaction. For INSPIRE, you will have these groups:

  • Regional, national and European Platform providers
  • Regional, national and European Data Providers
  • Regional, national and European Data Users
  • Service Providers
  • Service Users

One organization or person can take multiple roles at the same time, or in temporal succession.

A successful platform has to provide value to all actors, and the capture of value needs to be balanced carefully. If one group is extracting too much value, the platform can fail quickly. As an example, consider Uber, the ride-sharing platform: Most risks and costs lie with Drivers, some with Passengers, but basically none with the Platform operator. This has led to significant protests as well as legislation being passed that effectively banned Uber from operating in many territories.

Platform Market value matrix

In addition to the value provided to the various actor groups, there are also external effects, so called Externalities:

  • Positive Externalities:
    • ParkNow - Lower environmental disturbance due to less park space search
  • Negative Externalities:
    • AirBnB – Noise and disturbance for neighbours, value of property might go down
    • Uber – Taxi drivers lose income

Platforms can take different forms. There can be proprietary platforms such as Uber for ride shares, open platforms such as Micro Four Thirds for photographic and videographic equipment, or partially open platforms such as Amazon Web Services. INSPIRE, with its common set of open standards for network services and data specifications, is an open platform. Everybody can in principle contribute to the platform as a data provider or as a data consumer.

Characteristics of Platform Markets

Not all markets are equally suited to be disrupted by a platform model. Let’s first have a look at some typical characteristics of platform markets:

  • There are strong network effects, i.e. there is an exponential benefit in getting more producers and consumers on the platform;
  • There are Winner Takes All tendencies, i.e. because of the strong network effects, there is a tendency for one platform to capture the entire market;
  • There are dynamic effects between roles, such as interactions with content (upvoting) leading to more interactions with the same content. These dynamics can occur either inside one stakeholder group (Same-Side effects) or across stakeholder groups (Cross-side effects).

There are certain indicators for whether disruption of a market by platforms is likely:

  • Information Intensive (instead of being intense in physical resource requirements)
  • Unscalable Gatekeepers (there are bottlenecks in accessing the underutilized resource, such as finding it, accessing it and using it)
  • Highly Fragmented (there are many smaller specialised actors)
  • Information Asymmetries (one stakeholder group has far more information than another)

We can easily see that public geospatial data providers match this description well. Partially, the market for public geospatial data providers has already been disrupted: Think classical map making. Paper maps used to be based on authoritative data. Everybody who travelled a little probably had dozens, or even hundreds of these maps. Nowadays, we use Google Maps and in-car navigation systems. These mostly use data specifically captured by commercial companies such as HERE and TomTom. As a consequence, sales for paper maps have dropped dramatically.

However, public authorities still have extremely valuable data ranging from environmental monitoring to cadastral parcels to infrastructure and utilities data that could form the basis for many applications.

INSPIRE as an Open Platform

We think that when INSPIRE is implemented, it provides an opportunity for a true platform revolution of the European geospatial data market. The market for geospatial data has been growing by more than 10% each year in the last 10 years, but most of that is not captured by public data providers.

Obviously, we are not yet there entirely. Things that are missing (in practice) include:

  1. Standard licensing and purchasing frameworks (One-click buying for all data sets) with accessible pricing
  2. Widespread deployment of stable, cost-effective infrastructure software (instead of everybody trying to build and operate their own solutions)
  3. Modern, mainstream-accessible interfaces for accessing data (such as the current WFS 3.0) and metadata (such as RDF via LDProxy)
  4. A clearly articulated and balanced value proposition to all stakeholder groups

The last point is one I’d like conclude on. A recurring theme of discussions around INSPIRE was whether it’s useful to implement for data providers, and whether there would be actual use cases that can directly build on the INSPIRE infrastructure. Should the INSPIRE infrastructure become a successful platform where all stakeholders win, we – as a community – need to define these benefits quickly and clearly. So, let’s work together to make INSPIRE the next platform revolution!

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INSPIRE is a digital infrastructure, but it is also a community. This community meets on-line, and also face to face at events such as the annual INSPIRE conference. Events really do bring people together to share challenges, ideas and solutions.

As part of the INSPIRE community, we wanted to establish a new opportunity to do exactly that. Thus, we organized the first INSPIRE and Beyond (IAB) conference. It took place from 23rd – 24th May, 2018 in Darmstadt, Germany, at one of the world’s leading applied research organisations, Fraunhofer IGD. With about 35 registrants – all of whom came to the event – it was still an intimate group.

In terms of the format, we decided to combine a presentations track with a workshop track based on feedback from early registrants. The IAB 2018 included keynote sessions and talks on topics related to the INSPIRE Directive, its implementation, challenges and outlook. In the workshop track, it offered training focused on tools and technologies that can help geodata providers to efficiently implement the directive.

INSPIRE is a digital infrastructure, but it is also a community. This community meets on-line, and also face to face at events such as the annual INSPIRE conference. Events really do bring people together to share challenges, ideas and solutions.

As part of the INSPIRE community, we wanted to establish a new opportunity to do exactly that. Thus, we organized the first INSPIRE and Beyond (IAB) conference. It took place from 23rd – 24th May, 2018 in Darmstadt, Germany, at one of the world’s leading applied research organisations, Fraunhofer IGD. With about 35 registrants – all of whom came to the event – it was still an intimate group.

In terms of the format, we decided to combine a presentations track with a workshop track based on feedback from early registrants. The IAB 2018 included keynote sessions and talks on topics related to the INSPIRE Directive, its implementation, challenges and outlook. In the workshop track, it offered training focused on tools and technologies that can help geodata providers to efficiently implement the directive.

Participants at INSPIRE and Beyond 2018

For starters

In the opening keynotes, we wanted the attendees to get a clear understanding of where we currently stand in terms of INSPIRE implementation, and what the main open challenges are. For this purpose, we invited two keynote speakers.

The first keynote presentation “INSPIRE – current status and what can we expect” was delivered by Prof. Dr. Robert Seuss from the Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences. Prof. Seuss pointed out crucial challenges in the INSPIRE implementation, and gave an outlook for future expectations. One of interesting takeaways is the expectation that INSPIRE will be fueled by mega trends like Digitalization and Open Data which help a lot in understanding the possible outcomes and the added value of a successfully implemented directive.

Nicolas Hagemann from the German SDI Coordination Office addressed the question of the current INSPIRE and SDI status in Germany in the second key note presentation “INSPIRE at the finish line?”. He showed the latest statistics for INSPIRE progress from respective EU reports. His key takeaways were that INSPIRE implementation is approaching the finish line in Germany, but that there is also a lot of work ahead to complete the provision of interoperable data sets in Annex II and Annex III, as well as to align INSPIRE to national projects in Germany and to other European initiatives.

Innovation is crucial

In the innovation session, we started off with a presentation on the next generation of “Cloud-based INSPIRE services”. Michel Krämer (Fraunhofer IGD) focused on how to implement future spatial data services based on the WFS 3.0 specification in a native cloud architecture. The presentation gave insights into how GeoRocket, an Open Source framework developed by the Fraunhofer IGD GEO Group, can address challenges such as large data volumes, a wide variety of use cases and low operating costs. Wetransform currently works with Fraunhofer on this topic and thus wants to contribute to innovations that make INSPIRE data really useful.

The Opening Keynotes Session

Being practical and technical

At IAB, we offered four workshops, which addressed a wide range of topics from data models in INSPIRE, data transformation, data publishing, as well as an advanced workshop on Groovy scripting in hale studio.

In the Data Modelling workshop, Thorsten first started with the “why” of data models, and then introduced processes to manage them and tools to design them. The focus was clearly on the methodology of designing a data model, but he also showed innovative tools for data-driven modelling and for profiling of data models.

In the Data Transformation workshop, Simon focused on advanced topics in data transformation in hale studio, such as the new capabilities for merging alignments.

The Data Publishing workshop addressed questions of creating INSPIRE compliant View and Download services, including metadata. This workshop also provided clarification on some common questions related to compliance.

The Groovy Scripting workshop presented the hale studio option to define custom functions using Groovy Scripting. In this workshop, Johanna Ott and Simon Templer shared how to develop these, along with a lot of recipes for solving common issues in transformation.

And what is beyond INSPIRE?

INSPIRE is not supposed to be self-serving only. One of the key questions driving the community nuts right now is what business processes and values chains will build on the infrastructure, and currently, such processes are still rare. For this reason, we included two sessions on Business and Applications.

“Smart Cities” are another hyped concept where actual applications are often not that clear. However, both smart cities and INSPIRE build on data. INSPIRE mostly contributes more static, reference data, whereas smart cities provide a dynamic were a central point of the Application session with presentations showing use cases and examples on how geodata can improve smart cities management, or how geodata can drive better citizens participation in their cities.

While Veneta Ivanova, from the Fraunhofer OGD Institute focused on citizen’s participation in her presentation, Szymon Ciupa, from the Smart Cities Initiative, explained current challenges and practices in smart cities management.

Kate Lyndegaard then switched gears and showed how INSPIRE and another EU legislation, the famed GDPR, intersect. She explained the scope of both legislations, and explained how to tackle GDPR in terms of INSPIRE using examples of personal data stored in the metadata. INSPIRE and GDPR: Are they interoperable? was probably the hottest presentation in terms of the discussion it generated, not only in the session, but also during the breaks. This is no wonder considering that the GDPR was to come into force in just two days after the event, and that there is massive uncertainty in how it will play out for all involved.

Anida Jusufovic concluded the business session with an in-depth presentation about optimizing procurement processes. In Getting what you need: Optimizing Procurement for INSPIRE solutions she walked the event attendees through the tendering and procurement jungle and showed some steps that can increase the efficiency in INSPIRE procurement projects. Based on a structured decision tree, institutions can see and decide which procurement model works best for them and in that way increase the outcome quality and reduce risks. The decision tree can be separately downloaded and viewed here.

A Strong Network of Partners

The morning of the second IAB day was dedicated to wetransform partners and their integrated solutions and services.

In “Can you stand your success?” Ikka Rinne from Spatineo presented tools for testing service availability, performance and capacity that can effectively be used in INSPIRE projects. In his engaging presentation you can find out more about the Spatineo Monitor, a plug-in for INSPIRE GIS, or about other innovative tools coming from Spatineo.

Stefania Morrone, from Epsilon Italia, engaged the audience with interesting use cases in her session “INSPIRE as an effective tool for e-reporting: the EEA ‘EU Registry on industrial emissions’” Stefania presented the long term goals of an efficient INSPIRE implementation by clearly showing that the Directive is serving a self-purpose, but can offer more when planned accordingly.

Let us conclude

After two very engaging days, Thorsten Reitz concluded the first IAB event. His Closing Plenary started off by asking “Is INSPIRE leading the next platform revolution?” By using analogies of AirBnB, Uber, LinkedIn and other platform providers, the closing session offered the opportunity to think about INSPIRE as an open Geospatial Data Platform that would allow authoritative geospatial data to be utilized to its full potential.

Thorsten also explained some of the mid-term and long-term product strategies of wetransform, giving a sneak preview into the new touch-first Web Transformation tools that will become part of haleconnect.com in Q3 2018, and in explaining the road to different levels of autonomous data transformation.

The Closing Plenary and Open Feedback Round

Feedback – for IAB and for the INSPIRE community at large

The feedback round was the final highlight of the event: all attendees had a chance to provide direct feedback. We asked four questions:

  1. What would you like to see more of?
  2. What would you like to see less of?
  3. Which topics should this event address next year?
  4. Which topics should the INSPIRE community urgently address?

The attendees didn’t have any ideas what to skip, but there was plenty of feedback what to add to the event and which topics we could address:

  1. More presentations on INSPIRE use cases in production
  2. More presentations on how to use INSPIRE extensions to work with INSPIRE in practice
  3. More hands-on workshops
  4. More detailed presentations by users, e.g. on how they used hale studio to create transformation projects
  5. More presentations by wetransform that summarize the challenges and solutions observed across all customers
  6. More opportunities to “Bring your own Project / Data”

One somewhat critical point was the dual-language format of the conference (parts in German, parts in English). We will critically review our approach there and consider changes for 2019.

These were the main points with respect to the community at large:

  1. Clarify the role of extensions in INSPIRE
  2. Clearly explain which feature type is used for which use cases
  3. Move forward on maintenance of the current technical guidance, ideally with an annual release cycle
  4. Incorporate alternative or additional encodings such as GeoJSON and interfaces such as WFS 3.0 quickly so that current Annex II / III work can benefit from these developments
  5. Clarify what the alternatives to INSPIRE implementation would be, and how INSPIRE relates to these alternatives
  6. Specifically motivate sectors such as Utility companies why they should implement INSPIRE
  7. Better position INSPIRE outside the community and create significant connections to other policy areas, ranging from CAP to GDPR

We would like to thank everyone who attended the first INSPIRE and Beyond event and contributed to its success. This story will continue: We plan to organize another INSPIRE and Beyond next year and provide some more use cases and present interesting INSPIRE implementation projects.

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We have now changed our release cycles so that hale studio and hale connect releases happen in quick succession - first hale studio, then hale connect. In this way we ensure that all capabilities you can use in hale studio also work in hale connect. This latest version of hale connect has been rolled out to all public cloud and private cloud instances and includes the following updates:

  • Support for external datasets metadata sources such as Catalogue Services or Portals
  • Support for dataset attachments (such as PDFs, Textures and GeoTIFFs or other Raster data sets)
  • A New GetFeatureInfo client in the WMS map preview
  • A New Feature Explorer Tool specifically designed for object-oriented and linked data

To try out the new features, head over to www.haleconnect.com and either log in with your existing account or create a new (30-day trial) account.

We have now changed our release cycles so that hale studio and hale connect releases happen in quick succession - first hale studio, then hale connect. In this way we ensure that all capabilities you can use in hale studio also work in hale connect. This latest version of hale connect has been rolled out to all public cloud and private cloud instances and includes the following updates:

  • Support for external datasets metadata sources such as Catalogue Services or Portals
  • Support for dataset attachments (such as PDFs, Textures and GeoTIFFs or other Raster data sets)
  • A New GetFeatureInfo client in the WMS map preview
  • A New Feature Explorer Tool specifically designed for object-oriented and linked data

To try out the new features, head over to www.haleconnect.com and either log in with your existing account or create a new (30-day trial) account.

Support for external metadata sources

hale connect now supports the direct re-use of your existing metadata files. For theme managers, these options are configurable in the metadata section of your theme:

  • Select ‘Republish existing metadata’ to upload your XML or XSD during data set creation
  • Select ‘Link to existing metadata’ to provide a URL pointing to dataset metadata

This option you have selected appears in the metadata step of dataset creation. More information on metadata workflows is available from a recent tutorial.

Addign a link to an existing dataset metadata resource

Support for dataset attachments

hale connect 1.9.0 makes it possible to reference file attachments from uploaded or transformed data sets.

To upload attachments, navigate to the Files section of your data set and click the ‘Upload attachments’ button.

To reference the uploaded attachments, your GML source data needs to include the following expression as the value for the attribute which references the attachment: attachment:///<filename>. The filename of the attachment must be identical to the filename in the GML. When the dataset is published, the expression is transformed into a publicly available link to the uploaded attachment file.

Adding attachments to a dataset

Much Linked Data, as well as Open Standards Data, uses rich object-oriented models, with many explicit and implicit references between objects (or as the GIS community calls them, features). Such references are hard to navigate and use in a classical, layers-based GIS. We have thus developed a specific client to explore such data sets.

The Feature Explorer can be accessed via the GetFeatureInfo client on the WMS map preview for your published view services. The Feature Explorer can be used to explore GML that contains complex features and links to related features. INSPIRE compliant GML often contains links to related features, or codelists, which provide additional information about the feature.

To access the Feature Explorer, click on the ‘show Details’ button in the HTML view of GetFeatureInfo client. The Feature Explorer opens in a new tab which displays the attributes associated with the selected feature. Click on any link to further explore the attributes or related features. A ‘+’ button appears to the right of attributes which contain additional levels of nesting.

The FeatureExplorer component with link to codelists, attachments, and related resources and objects

GetFeatureInfo added to WMS Map Preview

GetFeatureInfo is an optional operation which allows users of your view services to query your WMS layers. The GetFeatureInfo client is only available for WMS layers which have been configured to support the GetFeatureInfo operation.

As a theme manager, you can activate GetFeatureInfo for your WMS in the View Services sections of the associated theme. To access the GetFeatureInfo client, click the Map view link in the View Services section of your dataset. Click on any feature in the map preview to view attributes for the selected feature. The GetFeatureInfo client allows you to select the feature layer you are viewing and the display format (HTML, plain text or XML).

Improved GetFeatureInfo and Tool in the Map Preview

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Spring is here and so is the latest release of hale studio. The new release 3.4.0 includes the addition of several, new, third-party plug-ins, new features, as well as numerous bug fixes:

  • Support for isolated workspaces in Geoserver App-Schema plugin
  • XtraServer configuration plugin
  • The alignment merger tool
  • View tasks and messages associated with alignment cells
  • Split GML output by feature type
  • Import Groovy snippets for use in transformation scripts
  • Preset for AAA/NAS XML schema
  • CLI option to output statistics and define custom success conditions

The whole list is available in the changelog.

Download the latest version and send us your feedback:


Spring is here and so is the latest release of hale studio. The new release 3.4.0 includes the addition of several, new, third-party plug-ins, new features, as well as numerous bug fixes:

  • Support for isolated workspaces in Geoserver App-Schema plugin
  • XtraServer configuration plugin
  • The alignment merger tool
  • View tasks and messages associated with alignment cells
  • Split GML output by feature type
  • Import Groovy snippets for use in transformation scripts
  • Preset for AAA/NAS XML schema
  • CLI option to output statistics and define custom success conditions

The whole list is available in the changelog.

Download the latest version and send us your feedback:


Support for isolated workspaces in Geoserver app-schema plugin

The app-schema plugin developed at GeoSolutions now comes with support for GeoServer’s isolated workspaces feature. Isolated workspaces allow service providers to restrict access to OWS layers through virtual services. A virtual service exists for each GeoServer workspace and publishes only those layers available on the associated workspace. Once a workspace is set to isolated, the contained layers are no longer visible or queryable by global services. The contents of an isolated workspace are accessible only via the associated virtual service. This functionality is useful for service providers who want to share specific services with different clients.

Thanks to the GeoSolutions team, specifically to Stefano Costa and Nuno Oliveira, for this contribution!


XtraServer configuration plug-in

XtraServer is a product of interactive instruments GmbH. It is a suite of implementations of various OGC service specifications, e.g. Web Feature Service (WFS) and Web Map Service (WMS). XtraServer services can be based on any application schema according to the Geography Markup Language (GML). For this, a mapping from the GML application schema to the table structure of the underlying database is to be provided in the configuration of the service. The mapping language of XtraServer is very flexible and can virtually map all GML application schemas to heavily deviating database schemas. For this reason, mappings can be quite complex.

The purpose of this plugin is to transform the XtraServer mappings to hale alignments (via Import) and generate a new XtraServer mapping file easily (via Export).

Thanks to interactive instruments, Jon Herrmann, and Andreas Zahnen for this contribution!


The Alignment Merger

Declarative Mappings, which we call Alignments, lend themselves to be re-used. One potential area of re-use is if you have one alignment that maps from A to B and another one that maps from B to C is that you could combine them into a single alignment from A to C. This is exactly what the Alignment Merger command-line component does - it allows you to merge two alignments that have a shared schema into one. As an example, say you have a mapping from a database to a national standard, and one from that national standard to INSPIRE. Now you can directly create a mapping from your database to INSPIRE, without much extra work!

The Alignment Merger will perform as many steps as possible automatically, but will sometimes require manual input from you. For this purpose, the Alignment Merger generates Tasks (see next new feature).

Thanks to the Implementierungspartnerschaft AAA-Dienste for funding this work.

Viewing tasks and messages associated with alignment cells

With the release of 3.4.0, users are able to view and manage tasks that are created by the alignment merger process. This functionality allows users to either dismiss tasks or edit cells directly before transformation.


Allow to split GML output by feature type

hale studio now supports the option to split GML by feature type during the export of a GML feature collection. This new option is helpful for users who want to reduce their file size or who need to work with GML files containing a single feature type.


Groovy snippets as re-useable resoruces

Now you can import Groovy scripts to your transformation project. Using Groovy snippets allows you to keep extensive logic in external files and to easily reuse them across different transformation scripts. You can reference a specific Groovy snippet by its identifier that you set when importing the snippet.


Preset for AAA XML schema

The list of presets for source and target schemas has been extended: The newest addition is the AAA (NAS) XML Schema 6.0.1.


CLI option to output statistics and define custom success conditions

Users performing transformation of source data using the command line interface in hale studio are now able to set customized success conditions through use of a Groovy script which is evaluated against the transformation summary. Success criteria included in an evaluation script might include: an XML schema validation with no errors, or that a certain number of objects were created.

Thanks to the Landesamt für Vermessung und Geobasisinformation Rheinland-Pfalz for funding this work.

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